Listen to this while you read about my new Colorado butterfly.

Theme 113, with a flute and trombone.

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Zizula cyna [STATE RECORD]

My new butterfly record is of Zizula cyna, a tiny subtropical blue that should not be here. It was taken near the Section 16 Trail, as the label says. I will go back this summer to see if it might persist in that environment. It is not particularly unusual to find stray subtropical butterflies in Colorado, but one this tiny is hard to imagine. Perhaps it came on a car with travelers, but if so, it flew hundreds of yards to the locality in which I found it. So, maybe…

Butterflies of the Pikes Peak Region

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Pyrgininae

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HesperiinaeScreen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.08.14 PM

PapilionidaeScreen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.10.54 PM

PieridaeScreen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.26.43 PM

Lycaenidae 1Screen Shot 2019-08-20 at 8.37.49 AM

Lycaenidae 2Screen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.32.17 PM

NymphalinaeScreen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.35.40 PM

Melit. & Arg.Screen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.41.12 PM

SatyriinaeScreen Shot 2019-08-18 at 5.43.42 PM

Addendum: Here are species that I didn’t have on pins.Screen Shot 2019-08-25 at 12.08.02 PM.png

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These are 164 of the 206 species that have been recorded in El Paso County. Many of the rest are rare strays, but we may see them more commonly as the climate warms. Adelpha bredowi, for example, used to be a rare stray, but it shows up almost every year now in the region. I will continue to add to this set as new photos come in from the Pikes Peak Region, with your permission, of course.

More on the ?Insect Apocalypse

As a follow up to my earlier report on the butterflies and diurnal moths of the Pikes Peak Region, I took the advice of Steve Taylor and prepared a graphic of all 255 dates on which I counted butterflies, and on which the time, temperature, and other conditions were favorable to flight. This shows the “noise” encountered in this sort of work, as well as the extraordinary summers of 2012-2014. If there is a trend, it might show up as a decline after 2015, when levels are about as they were early in the study. Note that most of the points from 2015 on fall below the mean score of 72.5/h. However, the overall slope is very slightly up (+0.032x). I can’t wait to continue observations this summer.All w fit.png

If I restrict the data to just the 145 dates that are from Bear Creek Canyon, there is a very slightly different trend, this time downward (–0.12x), from about 91 to 74 over the 35 years. Maybe this is the apocalypse! More later!BCC Only.png

New Moths for 2018

The following moths, discovered by several workers in the region, are new to my database of species in the Pikes Peak Region. Thanks to Eric Eaton, Aaron Driscoll, Zach Vogel, and Van Truan for posting photos of some of these. The ones without initials are from my collection, mainly from the bioblitz at Corral Bluffs in September. At that site, on one night, I took ten species new to the region.12345678

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Thirty-six new species found in the area. Keep going, guys. This is fun.

Letting Go

After 33 years of collecting moths in the Pikes Peak Region, I finally have begun to let it go to the C. P. Gillette Museum in Fort Collins at Colorado State University. The first installment, 36 drawers of mostly Noctuidae (the owlet moths) were shrink-wrapped and dispatched on August 29. One drawer is shown here.9.jpg

And here is the first load.IMG_2410.jpg

And in their new home.Screen Shot 2018-09-01 at 10.46.16 AM.png

Many more to go in the next few weeks. Sad to see them go, but I know that they’re in a better place. (!)